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Objectively Swifter: How Swift & C superpowers outperform Objective-C in ObjectBox Swift 0.8

Objectively Swifter: How Swift & C superpowers outperform Objective-C in ObjectBox Swift 0.8

While we’ve been optimizing ObjectBox for speed right from the beginning, making it the fastest database around, the fastest library in the world is useless if its interface to your language isn’t optimized for that language’s strengths and weaknesses. The 0.8.0 release of ObjectBox for Swift gives you a nearly 70% performance boost out of the box by improving the way we integrate with Swift:

How did we Achieve this Speed-Up?

When we created ObjectBox’s Swift binding, we did not have our C API yet. So, to bridge between the C++ database core and Swift, we implemented a number of classes using Objective-C++. Objective-C++ is neat: it looks to Swift like Objective-C (so like a Swift class), but will happily call into C++ code.

Objective-C is also a very different language from Swift, and particularly generics and structs don’t have a direct equivalent in Objective-C. So when we realized that many reactive frameworks in Swift were built around structs, we decided to change gears. We rewrote a number of core Objective-C classes in the Swift binding as Swift classes on top of the C API that we now use in all our newer language bindings, eliminating a lot of Objective-C’s dynamic dispatch, and generally improving upon algorithms here and there.

The main goal was to give our users struct support and lay the groundwork for taking advantage of Swift 5.1’s upcoming UTF8 strings by eliminating use of the UTF16-based NSString. We also wanted to bring ObjectBox’s Objective-C-beholden error handling in line with Swift conventions. So we expected modest speed-ups here and there, but a speed increase this noticeable even before Swift 5.1 was a pleasant surprise, and we wanted to get these improvements into our users’ hands as quickly as possible.

Using structs with ObjectBox

One rather unique aspect of Swift compared to other languages is how Swift defines the term struct as value type and class as reference type. That makes structs incredibly handy for cases where you want to guarantee an object can never change.

Thread-safety, for instance: if you know an object is unchangeable, there is no chance of race conditions while editing. You need no locks, no copies; your threads can all safely operate on the same memory.

However, when you put an object into your ObjectBox database, put(_:)updates the object’s id property to establish the association between the database entry and your object in memory. ObjectBox can’t do that with unchangeable structs, so we needed to make a slight adjustment to ObjectBox’s usual simple put(_:) flow:

Missed the difference? It’s tiny: You use put(struct:) instead of the regular put(_:). put(struct:) will create a copy of the struct you gave it with the ID changed to whatever ID the object was assigned in the database (the copy is what we store in savedUser in the above example).

So, what if you want to make changes? The way you change immutable structs is to make a copy with the one thing you wanted to change set to a different value. So while you could save it to the database using put(struct:), you already made a copy of the object, and it will not change after being saved, because it already has an ID. Won’t that second copy be wasteful?

That’s why Box now also offers putImmutable(_:). If you know that your object has already been saved, and you don’t need a copy. Just call putImmutable(_:). instead of put(struct:).

This will return the ID for your convenience, but you can always ignore it, if you do not need it.

What else has changed?

While we’re always improving things under the hood, not much should change for your existing ObjectBox code. Apart from the new ObjectBoxError enum replacing the janky old Objective-C-style OBXError... classes, your existing code should just compile. All the changes are in the generated code.

Go give it a try, and let us know how we’re doing.

ObjectBox Python Alpha

ObjectBox Python Alpha

As of today, you’ll be able to start using ObjectBox from the comfort of Python.

Whether you’re building an IoT solution, a desktop utility or a webservice, you’ll find the ObjectBox database handy to help you with data persistence. Among other features, ObjectBox provides implicit ACID transactions so there’s one less thing you have to worry about.

Let’s take a look at an example to see how ObjectBox lets you work with your data using Python:

Aside from x64 CPUs, ObjectBox supports ARMv6 and ARMv7, allowing you to benefit from a super-fast and scalable database on IoT devices, for example, the Raspberry Pi family (from the minimalistic Pi Zero to the high-spec Pi 3B+). You can also target desktop and server apps running on Linux, MacOS, or Windows using Python.

ObjectBox Python: How to get started

While this is still an early release in Python, it’s based on the proven ObjectBox core so you can already start building your applications today. Just install using

and head over to our GitHub repo at http://github.com/objectbox/objectbox-python to see some examples.

Your feedback helps us to improve ObjectBox, please share your thoughts and comments 🙂

ObjectBox EdgeX Release (Beta)

ObjectBox EdgeX Release (Beta)

ObjectBox now runs on the EdgeX Foundry IoT Edge Platform. Utilizing ObjectBox’ speed and ease of use, EdgeX users can now compute millions of data points on the edge with minimal latency. ObjectBox’ small footprint of less than 1MB makes the database uniquely optimized for high performance on IoT edge devices and gateways, as well as fog nodes. Combining the speed and size advantages of ObjectBox on the EdgeX platform, we empower companies to analyze more data locally on the machine, faster than ever before.

As an object oriented database, ObjectBox is the perfect solution for structuring data within complex data models, from artificial intelligence and machine learning applications, as well as image recognition software that is beginning to be used more commonly on the edge.

With ObjectBox-backed EdgeX we’re bringing the efficiency, performance and small footprint of ObjectBox to all EdgeX applications. It is fully compatible, so you can use it as a drop-in replacement. And if you call against existing REST or Go EdgeX APIs, you do not need to change the code. Our version is based on the latest sources leading to  EdgeX 1.0, which is scheduled for June. And once EdgeX 1.0 is finalized, we will be ready to upgrade the ObjectBox Edition to 1.0 right away.

Get started with ObjectBox EdgeX

The simplest way to get started is to fetch the latest docker-compose.yml and start the containers:

You can check the status of your running services by going to http://localhost:8500/. At this point, you have the REST services running at their respective ports, available to access from your EdgeX applications.

Find more details and sources in our GitHub repo at  https://github.com/objectbox/edgex-objectbox.

If you’re new to EdgeX, you can visit the EdgeX Foundry IoT Edge Platform home page to find out more.

Feedback

Last not least, we are always happy to hear from you. Post any questions you may have on stack overflow tagged ObjectBox. Please share your thoughts on ObjectBox EdgeX with us via TwitterFacebook, or Mail (contact [at] objectbox . io).

The ObjectBox Swift Beta is Here!

The ObjectBox Swift Beta is Here!



If you’ve ever needed a database for your iOS app, you’ve probably had to manage schemas, tables, query strings and all sorts of overhead. Moreover, whenever you wanted to modify the structure of your database, you had to write migration code so that your users’ data would be upgraded to fit the new structure.

Wouldn’t it be nice if your database just did all that for you, automatically? That was what we thought when we designed ObjectBox. ObjectBox thinks the way a Swift developer does: You take your objects and stick them in a box. You use regular Swift methods and operators to search for objects in your database. You add or remove fields and the database just copes with it. And you can use it right now.

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ObjectBox Swift for iOS and macOS

ObjectBox Swift for iOS and macOS

We’re happy to share our first Swift version of the ObjectBox database for iOS and macOS! We want to give you a Swift “native” API without any ObjectiveC legacy shining through, which is why we decided to put Swift, with its unique language features, first. We really want your feedback on this to improve swiftly, for example on our query API (more details below):

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Go, ObjectBox Golang!

Go, ObjectBox Golang!

Today, we are bringing the power of ObjectBox to Go. Whatever solution you are building, be it a web service, an IoT/IIoT solution, or any data-driven application, you will benefit from the efficiency and speed of ObjectBox (see benchmarks below). Let us know what you think!

Let’s look at some code, and see how ObjectBox persists Go structs (objects):

The ObjectBox Go API allows you to create data-driven cross-platform apps. ObjectBox supports x64 and 32 bit ARM (ARMv6 and ARMv7) CPUs, enabling you to benefit from a super-fast scalable database on IoT devices, industrial edge gateways or, for example, the Raspberry Pi family (from the minimalistic Pi Zero to the high-spec Pi 3B+). At the same time, you can now target desktop and server apps running on Linux, MacOS, or Windows using Go.

How to get started

To get started, please have a look at the ObjectBox Go docs. Here’s the TL;DR version for your bash:

This will clone the repository to your GOPATH, download the objectbox-c library and install the ObjectBox code generator.

At this point you can start using ObjectBox in your project – just define a struct you want to persist, add  //go:generate objectbox-gogen  comment in the same file and run go generate ./… on your project. See Getting started for more details.

Performance benchmarks

We have done some quick CRUD performance tests to give you an impression about the speed ObjectBox provides. On a i7-8850H CPU, ObjectBox consistently processes over 1.5 million CRUD operations per second with 4.4 million object reads per second:

The sources for the performance tests are part of the GitHub repository.

To put these numbers into perspective, we also did a comparison using an edge computing platform and two leading NoSQL databases. We won’t spill the names and final numbers just yet, as we are going to release all the details very soon. 😉

Disclaimer: ObjectBox was the only database running in embedded mode, which is not supported by the others in this setup. Obviously this can have a significant impact on performance. On the other hand, this is the most resource friendly mode of operation (RAM and CPU), which might be very relevant if you target restricted ARM32 devices.

Your feedback

This is the first public version of ObjectBox for Go and we are more than excited to get your feedback on it. We have prepared a short questionnaire for you, which should only take 1-2 minutes. Your feedback is extremely valuable to make ObjectBox a fun tool to use.

Future work

While this initial release covers all basic features, the native core of ObjectBox offers much more than what is currently exposed to Go. For example, a complete set of query conditions and relations between objects. Also, we will introduce a client/server operation mode. This will allow ObjectBox to run in Containers (e.g. Docker) and in classic server setups. As a major theme, the ObjectBox team is also working on data synchronization across devices. This keeps edge devices and gateways “in-sync”. Sync also enables seamless integration with mobile apps (Android and iOS) pushing relevant data to mobile clients and back.  Of course sync will also be available for Go. You can sign up here for updates on sync.