ObjectBox Recognized as a Sustainable Profitable Tech Solution by the Solar Impulse Foundation

ObjectBox Recognized as a Sustainable Profitable Tech Solution by the Solar Impulse Foundation

ObjectBox is proud to be officially recognized as a sustainable and efficient solution by the Solar Impulse Foundation. Although we have self-identified as a #sustainabletech company since our induction, we’re proud to be recognized as an “efficient, clean and profitable solutions with a positive impact on environment and quality of life,” after taking part in an in-depth technical and business evaluation with the team at the Solar Impulse Foundation.

Empowering tech innovation

This label recognizes that ObjectBox empowers innovation with a highly efficient and sustainable technology. The Solar Impulse Efficient Label identifies sustainable tech solutions from around the world to help companies choose their tech stack responsibly.  

solar-impulse-foundation-label-sustainable-software-for-the-edge

UN Sustainable Development Goals

All Solar Impulse awardees contribute to one or several of the UN Sustainable Development Goals; ObjectBox received the globally recognized label for supporting three of the Solar Impulse focused initiatives: 

  • Affordable and Clean Energy: ObjectBox
  • Clean Water and Sanitation
  • Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure : ObjectBox
  • Sustainable Cities and Communities: ObjectBox
  • Responsible Consumption and Production

How is ObjectBox sustainable?

objectbox-local-data-sustainable

ObjectBox enables scalable and sustainable digitalization with a high performance edge database solution and synchronization solution. The ObjectBox database empowers local data storage, while ObjectBox Sync reduces unnecessary data traffic. ObjectBox is therefore ideally suited for efficient, useful, and sustainable Edge Computing. 

Comparing the transmission of the same data sets, ObjectBox saves 20-60% on transmission data volume. By combining delta syncing with efficient compression based on standard and proprietary edge compression methods to keep data small, ObjectBox can reduce device energy consumption and thus CO2 emissions for data transmissions.

As our digital world grows, we all need to do what we can to structure these digital environments in an efficient and sustainable way. ObjectBox helps reduce digital waste. Digital waste unnecessarily burdens bandwidth infrastructure and fills cloud servers, forcing the expansion of cloud farms and in turn, contributing to the pollution of the environment. Therefore, we are excited to be part of the 1000solutions program.

Dr. Vivien Dollinger

CEO and Co-founder, ObjectBox

What does it mean to get a Solar Impulse Label? 

The Solar Impulse Label: a label focused on both the environment and profitability

The first label to assess the economic profitability of products or processes that protect the environment. The Solar Impulse Efficient Solution Label is attributed following a strict selection process performed by external independent experts. By ensuring high standards of sustainability and profitability, this internationally recognized label is considered as a credible marker of quality for solution seekers in business and governments, facilitating their sourcing of solutions to reach environmental commitments.

About the Solar Impulse Foundation

The Solar Impulse Foundation aims to identify clean, efficient and profitable solutions in order to accelerate their implementation and the transition to a sustainable economy. Thanks to the awarding of a label with high standards of sustainability and profitability, the Foundation can support political and economic decision-makers in their efforts to achieve their environmental targets and encourage them to adopt more ambitious energy regulations, necessary for implementation at large-scale of these solutions on the market. A way to take the success of the first round-the-world solar flight further.

white-leaf

Interesting in finding out how ObjectBox can make your edge computing project more sustainable?

What are Time Series Database Use Cases?

What are Time Series Database Use Cases?

What do self-driving cars, smart homes, autonomous stock/crypto trading algorithms, or energy sensor systems have in common? These applications are all based on a form of data that measures how things change over time. It’s called time-series data and it plays a very important role in our lives today.

Accordingly, time-series databases also became a hot topic.

time series database use cases

What is a time-series database?

A time-series database (TSDB) can be defined simply as a database optimized for storing and using time-stamped or time-series data. You don’t need to use a TSDB to work with time-series data. Any relational or NoSQL database or a key-value-store will do, e.g. MongoDB or redis. However, when dealing with time-series data (e.g. temperature, air pressure or car velocity data), a TSDB makes your life as a developer a hell of a lot easier.

Indeed, the two main reasons why TSDBs is the fastest-growing category of databases, are usability and scalability. A purpose-built time-series database typically includes common functions of time-series data analysis, which is convenient when working with time-series data. Because time-series data typically continually produces new data entries, data grows pretty quickly, and with high-frequency data or many time-series data sources, data ingestion quickly becomes a challenge. Time-series databases are optimized to scale well for time-series data with time being a common denominator and outperform any other database without specific time-series optimizations. This is why more and more people are adopting time-series databases and using them for a variety of use cases.

What are time-series database use cases?

Monitoring Use Case time series

Monitoring sensor data 

One of the use cases is the monitoring of sensor data for safety measurements, predictive maintenance, or assistance functions. E.g. a car stores and uses all kinds of sensor data like tyre pressure, surrounding temperature and humidity for driver assistance and maintenance support. An aircraft monitors gravity and aerodynamic principles to reassure pilots that everything is alright – or to alert them that something has gone wrong. In fact, a Boeing creates on average half a terabyte of data per flight, most of which is time-series data.  [1]

Logistics Use Case time series database

Tracking assets

Tracking assets is ideal for a time-series database as you constantly want to monitor where assets are, e.g. the cars of a fleet or any goods you might be stocking or shipping. These applications typically include unique vehicle or asset IDs, GPS coordinates, and additional metadata per timestamp. Apart from keeping track of the assets in realtime, you also can use the data for logistics and optimize e.g. your stocking and delivery processes.

edge time series ecommerce

Analyzing and predicting shopping behavior

Or, many e-commerce systems store all information of an item from product inventory, logistics data and any available environmental data to transaction amount, all items of the shopping cart purchased, to payment data, order information etc. In this case, a TSDB will be used to collect these large amounts of data and analyze them quickly to determine e.g. what to recommend to customers to buy next or optimize the inventory or predict future shopping behavior.

What are the most popular time series databases?

Well, here is our list of popular / established time series databases to use in 2020 to get you started:

  • InfluxDB: an open-source time series database, written in Go and optimized for high-availability storage and retrieval of time series data for operations monitoring, application metrics, IoT sensor data, and real-time analytics
  • KairosDB: a fast distributed scalable time series database written on top of Cassandra. 
  • Kdb+:  is a column-based relational time series database with a focus on applications in the financial sector.
  • Objectbox TS: superfast object persistence with time-series data on the edge. Collect, store, and query time-series data on the edge and sync selective data to / from a central location on-premise or in the cloud as needed.
  • TimescaleDB: an open-source database designed to make SQL scalable for time-series data. It is engineered up from PostgreSQL and packaged as a PostgreSQL extension with full SQL support.

For an overview of time-series databases currently available for productive use, see DB Engines. The database of databases is also a good resource if you are deeply interested in the database landscape; it is more extensive, but it includes any DB available independent of the level of support or if it is still maintained, also hobby projects. 

Time Series Database Use Cases

What do you do when you have more than just time-series data?

Typically, a time-series database is not well suited to model non-time-based data. Therefore, many companies choose to implement two databases. This increases overhead, disk space, and is especially impractical when you deal with edge devices. 

Time Series + Object-Oriented Data Persistence

Storing and processing both time series data and objects, developers can collect complex datasets and combine them with time-series data. Combining these data types gives a more complete understanding and context to the data – not just what happens over time, but also other factors that affect the results. 

The best option is a robust object-oriented database solution that lets you model your data as it reflects the factual use case / the real world in objects and on-top is optimized for time series data. You can model your world in objects and combine this with the power of time-series data to identify patterns in your data. If this is indeed a database optimized for restricted devices and Edge Computing, you can even use this data in real-time and on the device. By combining time series data with more complex data types, an object time-series edge database can empower new use cases on the edge based on a fast and easy all-in-one data persistence solution. 

Still have questions? Feel free to contact us here!

—–

[1] Time Series Management Systems: A Survey Søren Kejser Jensen, Torben Bach Pedersen, Senior Member, IEEE, Christian Thomsen

What Drives Edge Computing?

What Drives Edge Computing?

Data is exploding in every respect: in data volume, data velocity, and data variety (the 3 v’s). One driver of this phenomenon is the growing number of Mobile and IoT devices and thus, data sources. Making this data useful is one of the driving forces behind the adoption of Edge Computing. New use cases don’t only rely on using this data, but also upon the usability and speed of usability of this ever growing data. There are several practical challenges with this growing data volume that drive the adoption of Edge Computing:

New Use Cases Drive Edge Computing

what-drives-edge-computing

Bandwidth Limitations

The existing network infrastructure cannot support sending all the data to the cloud. Particularly in urban areas there is a concentration of devices and data overburdens existing infrastructure. While 5G promises some relief, it is no hailbringer. First of all, if you want to implement your IoT project now, 5G is not yet available and many questions about 5G remain, e.g. pricing. But moreover, as the number of devices and data is growing ever faster, it is already clear that data volumes will outpace what 5G can support. Edge Computing will be an important technology alongside 5G to enable IoT.

Fast Data Requirements  

Response time requirements are growing at the same time as data volumes are increasing. Sending data to the cloud for computation and storage means applications’ response times have a higher latency and depend on the network, which cannot guarantee response rates. Use cases that need speedy response times or guaranteed responses cannot rely on cloud computing. For example, in driver assistance, where every millisecond counts or in factory floors, where downtimes are too costly.

Sustainability

Sending data to the cloud and storing it there is inefficient and therefore costly – not only in plain €, but with regards to CO2 emissions too. The distance the data needs to travel needs hardware, connectivity and electric power. Therefore, sending data unnecessarily back and forth is wasteful beaviour and burdens the environment unnecessarily. With growing data volumes, that burden is growing. In fact, analysts predict  that cloud computing data centers will consume as much as 21% of the total global energy by 2030. [1]

To scale your prototype, you need to move to the edge

At the start of IoT projects, quick prototyping, testing and piloting on early iterations of an application’s functionalities, can effectively be done in the cloud. However, in productive environments when applications scale it is often hard or impossible to keep cloud costs at scale, making the business not viable. Then it is time to move to the edge.

At the same time, decreasing hardware costs and hardware sizes are enabling more complex local computing, meaning there is less need for additional cloud usage. E.g. increasingly AI and ML is done at the edge, including model training.

data-volume-edge-computing-solution-iot-mobile

Data accessibility and Smart Syncing

Today’s successful businesses require a smarter approach to data management and integration. Data synchronization increases operational efficiencies, saving time and resources by eliminating redundant data transfer. With data synchronization, only predefined, useful parts of a data set are sent to a central instance. This means that while large volumes of data can be collected and analyzed locally, not all of this data is sent to and saved in the cloud. This reduces the impact on bandwidth, utilizes the local hardware resources for fast guaranteed response times, and keeps project cloud costs low – ultimately creating a more sustainable and efficient model of data architecture, enabling long term project scalability. 

About ObjectBox

ObjectBox’ current database technology is enabling companies to persist and use data on edge devices, faster than any alternative on the market. This is a pre-requisite for true Edge Computing. On top, ObjectBox Sync is at a stage that allows developers to synchronize relevant information pieces of data from and to the edge with a central instance (e.g. an on-premise server or the cloud). Building upon this, ObjectBox plans to extend synchronization features to enable distributed synchronization and peer-to-peer synchronization, incorporating conflict resolution strategies. This enables networks of edge devices working without a central instance, enabling even more new use cases.

Objectbox-logo-white

The ObjectBox edge database and data synchronization solution solves
data persistence on the edge with speed, reliability, and ease.

10X Faster than
any Alternative

edge-cloud-white

From Edge
to Cloud

sync-data-synchronization-edge-cloud

Sync Data
Seamlessly

How Building Green IoT Solutions on the Edge Can Help Save Energy and CO2

How Building Green IoT Solutions on the Edge Can Help Save Energy and CO2

The internet of things (IoT) has a huge potential to reduce carbon emissions, as it enables new ways of operating, living, and working [1] that are more efficient and sustainable. However, IoT’s huge and growing electricity demands are a challenge. This demand is due primarily to the transmission and storage of data in cloud data centers. [2] While data center efficiency and the use of green energy will reduce the CO2 emissions needed for this practice, it is not addressing the problem directly. [3

iot-data-cloud-energy-waste

With ObjectBox, we address this unseen and fast-growing CO2 source at the root: ObjectBox empowers edge computing, reducing the volume of data transmitted to central data storage, while at the same time, heightening data transmission and storage efficiency. [4] We’ve talked before about how edge computing is necessary for a sustainable future, below we dive into the numbers a bit deeper. TLRD: ObjectBox enables companies to cut the power consumption of their IoT applications, and thus their emissions, by 50 – 90%. For 2025, the potential impact of ObjectBox is a carbon emission reduction of 594 million metric tons (see calculations below).

How ObjectBox’ Technology Reduces Overall Data Transmission

 ObjectBox reduces data transmission in two ways: 1. ObjectBox reduces the need for data transmission, 2. ObjectBox makes data transmission more efficient. ObjectBox’ database solution allows companies to build products that store and process data on edge devices and work with that data offline (as well as online). This

Green IoT Solution

not only improves performance and customer experience, it also reduces the overall volume of data that is being sent to the cloud, and thus the energy needed to transfer the data as well as store it in the cloud. ObjectBox’ Synchronization solution makes it easy for companies to transmit only the data that needs to be transmitted through 1) selective two-way syncing and 2) differential delta syncing. Synchronizing select data reduces the energy required for unnecessarily transmitting all data to the cloud.

We have demonstrated in exemplary case studies that ObjectBox can reduce total data transmissions by 70-90%, depending on the case. There will, however, typically be value in transmitting some parts of data to a central data center (cloud); ObjectBox Sync combines efficient compression based on standard and proprietary edge compression methods to keep this data small. ObjectBox also has very little overhead. Comparing the transmission of the same data sets, ObjectBox saves 40-60% on transmission data volume through the delta syncing and compression, and thus saves equivalent CO2 emissions for data transmissions. Additional studies support these results, and have shown that moving from a centralized to a distributed data structure, saves between 32 and 93% of transmission data. [5

sync-sustainable-data-save-energy

Calculations: How Does ObjectBox Save CO2?

Physically using a device consumes little energy directly; it is the wireless cloud infrastructure in the backend (data center storage and data transmission) that is responsible for the high carbon footprint of mobile phones [6] and IoT devices. Estimates say that IoT devices will produce around 2,8 ZB of data in 2020 (or 2,823,000,000,000  GB), globally. [7] Only a small portion of that data actually gets stored and used; we chose to use a conservative estimate of 5% [8] (141,150,000,000 GB) and of that portion, 90% is transferred to the cloud [9] (127,035,000,000 GB). Transferring 1 GB of data to the cloud and storing it there costs between 3 and 7 kWh. [10] Assuming an average of 5 kWh this means a 127,035,000,000 GB multiplied by 5kWh, resulting in a total energy expenditure of 635,175,000,000 kWh. Depending on the energy generation used, CO2 emissions vary. We are using a global average of 0,475 kgCO2 / 1 kwH. [11] In total this means that there will be 301,708,125,000 KG of CO2, or roughly 301 million metric tons of CO2 produced to transfer data to the cloud and store it there in 2020. 

Projections for 2025 have data volumes as high as 79.4 ZB. [12] Following the same calculations as above, IoT devices would be responsible for 8 billion metric tons of CO2 in 2025.* We estimate that using ObjectBox can cut CO2 caused by data transmission and data centers by 50-90%, by keeping the majority of data on the device, and transmitting data efficiently. It will take time for ObjectBox to enter the market, so assuming a 10% market saturation by 2025 and an average energy reduction of 70%, using ObjectBox could cut projected CO2 emissions by 594 million metric tons in 2025.

ObjectBox is on a mission to reduce digital waste which unnecessarily burdens bandwidth infrastructure and fills cloud servers, forcing the expansion of cloud farms and in turn, contributing to the pollution of the environment. As our digital world grows, we all need to give some thought to how we should structure our digital environments to optimize and support useful, beneficial solutions, while also keeping them efficient and sustainable. 

*Of course, in that time, the technologies will all be more efficient and thus use less electricity while at the same time CO2 emissions / kWh will have dropped too. Thus, we are aware that this projection is an oversimplification of a highly complex and constantly changing system.

[1] https://www.theclimategroup.org/sites/default/files/archive/files/Smart2020Report.pdf
[2] https://www.iea.org/reports/tracking-buildings/data-centres-and-data-transmission-networks
[3]“Data centres… have eaten into any progress we made to achieving Ireland’s 40% carbon emissions reduction target.” from https://www.climatechangenews.com/2017/12/11/tsunami-data-consume-one-fifth-global-electricity-2025/
[4] https://medium.com/stanford-magazine/carbon-and-the-cloud-d6f481b79dfe
[5] https://www.researchgate.net/publication/323867714_The_carbon_footprint_of_distributed_cloud_storage
[6] https://www.resilience.org/stories/2020-01-07/the-invisible-and-growing-ecological-footprint-of-digital-technology/
[7] https://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS45213219, https://priceonomics.com/the-iot-data-explosion-how-big-is-the-iot-data/, https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2018-11-07-gartner-identifies-top-10-strategic-iot-technologies-and-trends, https://www.iotjournaal.nl/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/white-paper-c11-738085.pdf, ObjectBox research
[8] Forrester (https://internetofthingsagenda.techtarget.com/blog/IoT-Agenda/Preventing-IoT-data-waste-with-the-intelligent-edge), Harvard BR (https://hbr.org/2017/05/whats-your-data-strategy), IBM (http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/pdfs/sg248435.pdf), McKinsey (https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/mckinsey-digital/our-insights/the-internet-of-things-the-value-of-digitizing-the-physical-world)
[9] https://www.gartner.com/smarterwithgartner/what-edge-computing-means-for-infrastructure-and-operations-leaders/
[10] According to the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy: 5,12 kWh of electricity / GB of transferred data. According to a Carnegie Mellon University study: 7 kWh / GB. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy concluded: 3.1 kWh / GB.
[11] https://www.iea.org/reports/global-energy-co2-status-report-2019/emissions
[12] https://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS45213219

Time Series & Objects: Using Data on the Edge

Time Series & Objects: Using Data on the Edge

Many IoT projects collect, both time series data and other types of data. Typically, this means they will run two databases: A time-series database and a traditional database or key/value store. This creates fracture and overhead, which is why ObjectBox TS brings together the best of both worlds in one database (DB). ObjectBox TS is a hybrid database: an extremely fast object-oriented DB plus a time-series extension, specially optimized for time series data. In combination with its tiny footprint, ObjectBox is a perfect match for IoT applications running on the edge. The out-of-the-box synchronization takes care of synchronizing selected data sets super efficiently and it works offline and online, on-premise, in the cloud.

time-series-data-example-temperature

What is time series data?

There are a lot of different types of data that are used in IoT applications. Time-series is one of the most common data types in analytics, high-frequency inspections, and maintenance applications for IIoT / Industry 4.0 and smart mobility. Time series tracks data points over time, most often taken at equally spaced intervals. Typical data sources are sensor data, events, clicks, temperature – anything that changes over time.

Why use time series data on the edge?

Time-series data sets are usually collected from a lot of sensors, which sample at a high rate – which means that a lot of data is being collected.

For example, if a Raspberry Pi gateway collects 20 data points/second, typically that would mean 1200 entries a minute measuring e.g. 32 degrees. As temperatures rarely change significantly in short time frames, does all of this data need to go to the cloud? Unless you need to know the exact temperature in a central location every millisecond, the answer is no. Sending all data to the cloud is a waste of resources, causing high cloud costs without providing immediate, real-time insights.

time-series-objects-edge

The Best of Both Worlds: time series + object oriented data persistence

With ObjectBox you aren’t limited to only using time series data. ObjectBox TS is optimized for time series data, but ObjectBox is a robust object oriented database solution that can store any data type. With ObjectBox, model your world in objects and combine this with the power of time-series data to identify patterns in your data, on the device, in real time. By combining time series data with more complex data types, ObjectBox empowers new use cases on the edge based on a fast and easy all-in-one data persistence solution. 

Bring together different data streams for a fusion of data; mix and match sensor data with the ObjectBox time series dashboard and find patterns in your data. On top, ObjectBox takes care of synchronizing selected data between devices (cloud / on-premise) efficiently for you.

time-series-data-visualization-dashboard

Get a complete picture of your data in one place

Use Case: Automotive (Process Optimization)

Most manufacturers, whether they’re producing cars, the food industry, or utilities, have already been optimizing production for a long period of time. However, there are still many cases and reasons why costly manual processes prevail.  One such example is automotive varnish. In some cases, while the inspection is automatic and intelligent, a lot of cars need to be touched up by hand, because the factors leading to the errors in the paint are not yet discovered. While there is a lot of internal expert know-how available from the factory workers, their gut feel is typically not enough to adapt production processes.

How can this be improved using time series and object data? 

The cars (objects) are typically already persisted including all the mass customization and model information. If now, all data, including sensor data, of the manufacturing site like temperature, humidity, spray speed (all time-series data) is persisted and added to each car object, any kind of correlations between production site variables, individual car properties and varnish quality can be detected. Over time, patterns will emerge. The gut feel of the factory workers would provide a great starting point for analyzing the data to discover Quick Wins before longterm patterns can be detected. Over time, AI and automatic learning kicks in to optimize the factory setup best possible to reduce the need for paint touch ups as much as possible. 

Use Case: Smart Grids

Utility grid loads shift continually throughout the day, effecting grid efficiency, pricing, and energy delivery. Using Smart Grids, utilities companies can increase efficiency and reliability in real time. In order to get insights from Smart Grids, companies need to collect a large volume of data from existing systems. A huge portion of this data is time series, e.g. usage and load statistics. On top, they incorporate other forms of data, e.g. asset relationship data, weather conditions, and customer profiles. Using visualization and analytical tools, these data types can be brought together to generate business insights and actionable operative goals.

ObjectBox TS: time series with objects

Storing and processing both time series data and objects on the edge, developers can gather complex data sets and get real time insight, even when offline. Combining these data types gives a fuller understanding and context for data – not only what happens over time, but what other factors could be influencing results. Using a fast hybrid edge database allows developers to save resources, while maintaining speed and efficiency. By synchronizing useful data to the cloud, real time data can be used for both immediate action, and post-event analysis.

Get in touch with our team to get a virtual demo of ObjectBox TS, or check out the sample GitHub repo to see more about the code.

What is Edge Computing?

What is Edge Computing?

Today, over 90 percent of enterprise data is sent to the cloud. In the next years, this number will drop to just 25 percent according to Gartner. The rest of the data is not going anywhere. It is being stored and used locally, on the device it was created on – e.g. cars, trains, phones, machines, cameras. This is Edge Computing – and since the Corona outbreak it is more relevant than ever.

Obviously, this is cutting the discussion short. With edge consortia springing up like mushrooms, there is no lack of overlapping definitions around the terms Edge Computing and Fog Computing.

what is edge computing

Benefits of Edge Computing put simply

The benefits of edge computing stem from its underlying paradigm: Edge Computing is a decentralized computing architecture as opposed to a centralized computing model (today typically cloud computing).

  • Data ownership / privacy: With Edge Computing data can stay where it is produced, used and where it belongs (with the user / on the edge devices)
  • Networking costs / Cloud costs: Reducing data transferrals and central storage reduces networking and cloud costs significantly
  • Bandwidth constrains: Bandwidth is limited and the data volumes are growing much faster than the bandwidth can be expanded (e.g. with 5G networks); it therefore puts a hard stop on many applications that can be overcome by building on the edge
  • Application / Data speed: Processing on the device – instead of sending data to the cloud and waiting for an answer – is way faster (latency)
  • Offline-capability: With Edge Computing, devices operate independent from a network / cloud connection, so the application always works and data parts that are needed centrally can be synced when convenient, needed, connected
  • The decentralized edge: Edge devices can communicate between each other directly. This decentralized Edge Computing approach more efficient (usually translating to speed) due to the short distances and because the power and information of several devices can be combined (for more info see: ultra low latency networks, peer-2-peer, M2M actions). On top, it adds resilience.
  • Security: A central instance with millions of data is more attractive to hack; also the data transferral adds an additional vulnaribility.

From mist to fog to edge to cloud – a short overview

To bring some light into the terminology mess: The terms “mist computing” and “cloud computing” constitute the ends of a continuum. In our definition, the edge covers everything from cloud to any end device, however tiny and limited it may be. In this definition, there really is only the cloud and the edge.

However, some authors additionally use the terms fog computing and mist computing.

Mist covers the computing area that takes place on really tiny, distributed, and outspread devices, e.g. humidity or temperature sensors. To make it a bit more tangible: These devices generally are too small to run an operating system locally. They just generate data and send that data to the network.

As opposed to mist computing, the cloud refers to huge centralized data centers. The terms “fog” and “edge” fall within this continuum and – depending on whose definition you follow – can be used interchangeably.

what is edge computing

From edge to cloud and back: History repeating itself

If these terms seem familiar to you, that is probably because edge computing is just another cycle in a series of computing developments.

Computing has seen constant turns between centralized and distributed computing over the decades, and with recent developments in hardware capacity, we’re again entering into a decentralized cycle.

edge vs cloud

Edge Computing has been around for 20 years, see a quick history here:

Cloud or edge? – one to rule them all?

Neither the cloud nor the edge is a solution for all cases. As always: It depends. There are cases, where the edge makes more sense than the cloud and vice versa. Most cases however, do need both. If you can, putting the bulk of your computational workload on the edge does make sense though from an economic as well as environmental perspective.

 Interested in learning more? Read why Android developers should care about Edge Computing or discover Edge IoT use cases.

A last word on “edge consortia”

There is no lack of consortia defining terms around edge computing – it’s a lot like the Judean People’s Front against the People’s Front of Judea. After a year of battle, the most prominent edge consortium emerging currently seem to be EdgeX under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation – fully open source, while also largely supported and driven by Dell, who initiated it. Other notable players trying to get a foothold in this space is the Deutsche Telekom with MobiledgeX and HPE with Edge Worx. A European counterpart, ECCE, formed in spring 2019 and might be worthwhile watching, as it is supported by many industry players like e.g. KUKA, Intel, and Huawei.