Flutter Databases are few. Therefore, we’re happy to take a big step towards 1.0 with this ObjectBox Dart v0.11 release, improving performance and bringing the much-desired relations support known from other ObjectBox DB language bindings to Dart/Flutter.

For those of you new to ObjectBox: ObjectBox is a superfast NoSQL object database for Flutter / Dart and here is how you can save data in your Dart / Flutter apps:

To learn about more ObjectBox features, like relations, queries and data sync, check our ObjectBox pub.dev page.

How fast is ObjectBox Dart? Performance Benchmarks

Speed is important for data persistence solutions. Accordingly, we wanted to test how ObjectBox compares performance-wise to other Flutter Dart database options. Therefore, we looked for libraries with comparable levels of storage abstraction and feature set –  so not just plain SQL/Key-value storage but also ORM-like features. There doesn’t seem to be that much choice… 

We looked at some two popular approaches: sqflite a SQLite wrapper for Flutter (no Dart Native support), and Hive, a key-value store with Class-adapters which seems still popular although its technology is phased out (see below). As a third alternative we pulled in Firestore, which does not really fit as it is no local database, but would be fun to compare anyway.

What we tested

To get an overview of the databases, we tested CRUD operations (create, read, update, delete). Each test was run multiple times and executed manually outside of the measured time. Data preparation and evaluation was also done outside of the measured time.

We tried to keep the test implementations as close as possible to each other while picking the approaches recommended by the docs for each database. We open sourced the test code at https://github.com/objectbox/objectbox-dart-performance if you want to have a closer look.

Performance Benchmark Results

Looking at the results, we can see ObjectBox performing significantly faster than sqflite across the board, with up to 70 times speedup in case of create & update operations. Compared to Hive, the results are a little more varied, with Hive being faster at reading objects than ObjectBox (we come to that later in our outlook), and ObjectBox being faster at creating objects, about four times faster at updates and three times for deletes. As a mostly-online database, it becomes clear that Firestore’s performance is not really comparable.

Implementation notes

ObjectBox: This release largely boosted the performance. The remaining bottlenecks are due to Dart itself and how it allows to modify byte buffers. There’s potential to double the speed if we look at other languages supported by ObjectBox. And if that’s not happening soon, we’d still have the option to do some low-level hacks…

Sqflite: a wrapper around SQLite, which is a relational database without direct support for Dart objects. Each dart object field is mapped to a column in the database, as per sqflite docs, i.e. converting between the Dart class and a Map.

Hive: We’ve tested with the latest Hive release, which is technically discontinued. The author hit two architectural roadblocks (RAM usage and queries) and is currently in the process to do a rewrite from scratch.
Update: strictly speaking it’s not straightforward to directly compare e.g. ObjectBox vs. Hive. In Hive, the high read numbers result from Dart objects already cached in memory. If the objects are fetched using the async API from disk, the numbers drop by factor 1000.

Firestore: This is totally apples and oranges, but we still decided to include Firebase/Firestore as it seems at least somewhat popular to “persist data”. It’s quite Cloud centric and thus offers limited offline features. For example, in order to use batches (“transactions”), an internet connection is required to “commit”. Also, due to its low performance, the test configuration was different: batches of 500 objects and only 10 runs.

Test setup

We ran the benchmarks as a Flutter app on a Android 10 device with a Kirin 980 CPU. The app executed all operations in batches of 10.000 objects, with each batch forming a single transaction. Each test was run 50 times, averaging the results over all the runs. This ensured the VM warmup (optimization) during the first run and garbage collections don’t affect the overall result significantly. (We care about accurate benchmarks; read more about our benchmarking best practices here.)

Outlook

With this latest release, we’re not far away from a stable API for a 1.0 release (🎉), so please share your thoughts and feedback. For the next release, we’ll add features like async operations, more relation types and some smaller improvements. We are also working on an ObjectBox variant for the Web platform that is planned close to the 1.0 release. And of course there is ObjectBox Data Sync for Flutter/Dart. If you want to be first in line to try, drop us a line, we can put you on the shortlist.

Do you like ObjectBox?