Three small things to do some good for startups

Three small things to do some good for startups

Startups and small companies are an important part of the whole ecosystem and it is typically small teams pushing very hard to deliver value and grow alongside the value they add. And it is super easy to do some good for these companies while also doing something fun that is also helpful for other people. Here are three valuable free and fun ways to help small companies / startups and actually everyone that could benefit from the solution:

stars review sparkle shine startups

Give them a review / 5-star rating 

If you remember three good experiences, startup / small company services or products, go ahead now and leave a rating on a suitable platform; typically Google reviews work as a fallback. Other options could be: G2C, alternativeto, product hunt, Amazon. It will literally take you a minute to help this company that in your view has provided a good or maybe even excellent experience for you – and might change the world for them.

grateful open source

Share an honest recommendation with your network ❤️

Good or bad – as long as it is a heartfelt honest review, it will benefit others and the companies. However, sharing a review on the best experiences, tools, things from smaller companies / startups is more fun and will help the companies, and probably benefit yourself more too 🙂 You can put it on your blog, on Social Media, tag the company, so they can reshare, retweet, use the quote. 

And I will start right away with the three best tools for staying in touch digitally / digital marketing that I discovered this year:

heart share thank you startup

Quuu

Quuu is a content suggestion platform that does suggest high-quality content and has quite enough tech content for me to be interesting. So far, I have seen no spam or overly promotional content among the suggestions. Typically, suggestions will be well-structured articles that provide some value. So, I use it as an additional source of discovery and think it is great for that. I have looked the company up and connected to the team on LinkedIn – and I think they are a still fairly small startup, so one more reason to support their good work. As far as I know, they are bootstrapped. And the times I needed support, it has been an overwhelmingly fast and friendly experience.

heart share thank you startup

Power ecard

If you want to send ecards to your friends, or business partners, or anyone in your network, this ecard tool is easy to use and has nice designs readily available to combine with your individual ideas, logo, colours etc. It’s a great way to let people know you thought about them without the paper waste. And you can customize as many individual cards or batches as you like, so you do not need to drop being very personal. I do prefer it over writing traditional postcards, so I don’t only use it for business, but also for family and friends (of course they get different cards). Full disclaimer: I know the founders well, quite a small company too, but I do love the work. They are bootstrapped. 

heart share thank you startup

Aircall for digital conferences

While it is in one way just another videocall tool, it was the best digital conference experience I had this year. So, if you need to organize a bigger team meeting or a conference or something along those lines, it might be worth a look. I do like that the listeners can give TikTok-style feedback with emojis and that it is super easy to move to a breakout-session format that works seamlessly. It’s all in all just a bit more interactive and that  helps the participants as well as the speakers to move beyond consuming a presentation that could instead also be a video. From crunchbase it looks as if they are a European company and already at series C level; still a startup somehow.

feedback dialogue

Be blunt – answer the next three cold outreaches honestly 👂

Unless it is total spam of course, answer the next three outreaches you get with why you typically would not respond or do not accept a LinkedIn request. I do see a lot of welldone and really badly done outreaches – and just ignore them. I think its fair, considering the flood of messages you get these days, but I also think we would all be better of if we could overall reduce that noise and any answer is better than no answer. So, to do some good, I randomly pick the next three and tell them why I am not accepting their LinkedIn request or why I would not have responded to their message and that I would appreciate no further messages in a nice way. If the receiver listens, I think it can benefit them a lot.

Digital Healthcare – a look at the market, projections, and trends with in-depth white paper

Digital Healthcare – a look at the market, projections, and trends with in-depth white paper

If you work in the healthcare industry, you are likely familiar with some uses of IoT devices. According to Gartner (2020), 79% of healthcare providers are already successfully employing IoT solutions.[1] However, this is just the beginning. While before COVID-19, the growth of digital health adoption had stalled [2], the market is picking up speed again. Indeed, Q3 2020 was a record year for investments in healthcare companies [3] and the market expects rising investments in healthtech for next years [4]. Today, underutilized data plays a major role in healthtech innovation [17] and the growing importance of healthcare data for future offerings is evident [5]. Take a look how analyts from Gartner to Accenture and Forrester expect the market to grow:

The digital healthcare market 2020 and beyond

digital-healthcare-market-trends-2020-edge-iot
  • Analysts expect Artificial Intelligence in healthcare to reach $6.6 billion by 2021 (with a 40% CAGR). [6]
  • The Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) market is expected to cross $136 billion by 2021. [11
  • Analysts expect the healthcare wearable market to have a market volume of $27 billion by 2023 (with a 27.9% CAGR). [7]
  • The IoT industry is projected to be worth $6.2 trillion by 2025 and around 30% of that market (or about $167 billion) will come from healthcare. [8]
  • Analysts expect the global Medical Health Apps market to grow to $236 billion by 2026, reflecting a shift towards value based care. [9]
  • The projected global digital health market is estimated to reach $510.4 billion by 2026 (with a 29% CAGR). [10]

The Healthcare industry has been struggling with shrinking payments and cost optimizations for years. [18] Fueled by the need to adopt in light of the COVID pandemic, digital technologies bring extensive changes quickly to this struggling industry now. Data is moving to the center of this changing ecosystem and harbors both risks and opportunities in a new dimension. [21] The basic architecture and infrastructure to have the data reliably, securely and quickly available where they are needed will be decisive for the success or failure of digital healthcare solutions. [17] [21]

We recommend keeping an eye on the following five trends

The 5 biggest digital healthcare trends to watch

AI-health-growth-market-tech

Artificial Intelligence (AI)  

Accenture estimates that AI applications can help save up to $150 billion annually for the US healthcare economy by 2026. [6] Therefore, it is no wonder that the healthcare sector is expected to be among the top five industries investing in AI in the next couple of years. [19] The top three greatest near-term value AI applications in healthcare are: 1. robot-assisted surgery ($40 billion), 2. virtual nursing assistants ($20 billion), and 3. administrative workflow assistance ($18 billion). 

big-data-health-analytics

Big Data / Analytics

The goal of big data analytic solutions is to improve the quality of patient care and the overall healthcare ecosystem. The global healthcare Big Data Analytics market is predicted to reach $39 billion by 2025. [12] The main areas of growth are medical data generation in the form of Electronic Health Records (EHR), biometric data, sensors data. 

internet-of-medical-things-digital-healthtech

Internet of Medical Things (IoMT)

IoMT is expected to grow to $508.8 billion by 2027. [13] According to Gartner, 79% of healthcare providers are already using IoT in their processes. [27] During COVID, IoMT devices have been used to increase safety and efficiency in healthcare, i.e. providing and automating clinical assistance and treatment to the infected patient, to lessen the burden of specialists. Future applications, like augmented reality glasses that assist during surgery, are leading to a focus more on IoMT-centric investments. [14]

telemedicine-virtual-healthcare-online

Telehealth / Telemedicine

Telecommunications technology enables doctors to diagnose and treat patients remotely. Consumer adoption of telehealth has skyrocketed in 2020 and McKinsey believes that up to $250 billion of current US healthcare spend could potentially be virtualized. [25] Also, many patients view telehealth offerings more favorable and – having made good experiences – are planning to continue using telehealth in the future. [26] Not astonishingly, telemedicine stocks also grow rapidly. [14]

edge-computing-hospital-clinic-offline

Edge Computing

Edge computing is a technological megashift happening in computing. [23] Instead of pushing data to the cloud to be computed, processing is done locally, on ‘the edge’. [15] Edge Computing is one of the key technologies to make healthcare more connected, secure, and efficient. [22]  Indeed, the digital healthcare ecosystem of the future depends on an infrastructure layer that makes health data accessible when needed where needed (data liquidity). [21] Accordingly, IDC expects the worldwide edge computing market to reach $250.6 billion in 2024 with a (12.5% CAGR) [24with healthcare identified as one of the leading industries that will adopt edge computing. [16

In-depth market overview with a look at the major market challenges and in-depth use cases

The healthcare market is in the middle of a fast digital transformation process. Drivers such as COVID,  growing IoT adoption in healthcare, and underlying social mega-trends are pushing digital healthcare growth to new heights. Therefore, the digital healthcare industry faces many challenges, both technical and regulatory. At the same time the healthcare market is offered a wealth of opportunities.

“While the challenges are numerous, leaders who seize the mindset that “disruptive change provides an opportunity to separate yourself from the pack” will build organizations meaningfully stronger than the ones they ran going into the crisis.” [20]

Interested in getting an in-depth fresh assessment of the digital healthcare landscape, including market drivers, biggest challenges and detailed use cases? 

Access your copy of the Digital Healthcare in 2020: Digitalization, IoT and Edge Computing white paper by singing up below:

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Digital Healthcare whitepaper, table of contents

The Digital Healthcare Market 2020 and Beyond, a High Speed Revolution

Drivers of Growth and Change in Digital Healthcare

– COVID
– Growing Medical IoT Device Adoption
– The Explosion of Health Data
– Technological innovations: Edge Computing, AI, and VR
– Underlying Social Megatrends

The Challenges of Digital Healthcare / Healthtech

– Data Volume and Availability
– Reliability, Privacy, and Data Security
– IT Costs

Why Edge Computing is Integral to Data-driven Healthcare Ecosystems

– A quick look at Cloud and Edge Computing
– How Edge Computing contributes to resilient and secure healthcare data systems
– Transforming Healthcare with Edge Computing
– Use Case: Secure and Up to Date Digital Record Keeping in Doctors Offices
– Use Case: Connected Ambulances – Real Time Data from Home to Hospital

 

Digital Healthcare: Key Take-Aways

References

[1] https://www.computerworld.com/article/3529427/how-iot-is-becoming-the-pulse-of-healthcare.html / https://www.gartner.com/en/documents/3970072
[2] https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insights/health/leaders-make-recent-digital-health-gains-last
[3] https://sifted.eu/articles/europes-healthtech-industry-2020/
[4] https://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/emea/health-tech-investments-will-continue-rise-2020-according-silicon-valley-bank
[5] https://news.crunchbase.com/news/for-health-tech-startups-data-is-their-lifeline-now-more-than-ever/
[6] https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-artificial-intelligence-healthcare%C2%A0
[7] https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/wearable-medical-devices-market
[8] https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/PressReleases/iot-healthcare.asp
[9] https://www.grandviewresearch.com/press-release/global-mhealth-app-market
[10] https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2020/05/23/2037920/0/en/Global-Digital-Health-Market-was-Valued-at-USD-111-4-billion-in-2019-and-is-Expected-to-Reach-USD-510-4-billion-by-2025-Observing-a-CAGR-of-29-0-during-2020-2025-VynZ-Research.html
[11] https://www2.stardust-testing.com/en/the-digital-transformation-trends-and-challenges-in-healthcare
[12] https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/healthcare-analytics-market-size-to-reach-usd-40-781-billion-by-2025–cagr-of-23-55—valuates-reports-301041851.html#:~:text=Healthcare%20Big%20Data%20Analytics%20Market,13.6%25%20during%202019%2D2025 
[13] https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2020/11/25/2133473/0/en/Global-Digital-Health-Market-Report-2020-Market-is-Expected-to-Witness-a-37-1-Spike-in-Growth-in-2021-and-will-Continue-to-Grow-and-Reach-US-508-8-Billion-by-2027.html
[14] https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/iomt-meets-new-healthcare-needs%3A-3-medtech-trends-to-watch-2020-11-27
[15] https://go.forrester.com/blogs/predictions-2021-technology-diversity-drives-iot-growth/
[16] https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/state-of-the-edge-forecasts-edge-computing-infrastructure-marketworth-700-billion-by-2028-300969120.html
[17] https://news.crunchbase.com/news/for-health-tech-startups-data-is-their-lifeline-now-more-than-ever/ 
[18] https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2020-05-21-gartner-says-50-percent-of-us-healthcare-providers-will-invest-in-rpa-in-the-next-three-years
[19] https://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS46794720 
[20] https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/the-great-acceleration-in-healthcare-six-trends-to-heed 
[21] https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/the-next-wave-of-healthcare-innovation-the-evolution-of-ecosystems 
[22] https://www.cbinsights.com/research/internet-of-medical-things-5g-edge-computing-changing-healthcare/
[23] https://siliconangle.com/2020/12/08/future-state-edge-computing/
[24] https://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS46878020
[25] https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/telehealth-a-quarter-trillion-dollar-post-covid-19-reality
[26] https://go.forrester.com/blogs/will-virtual-care-stand-the-test-of-time-if-youre-asking-the-question-its-time-to-catch-up/
[27] https://www.computerworld.com/article/3529427/how-iot-is-becoming-the-pulse-of-healthcare.html

 

Edge Database Comparison: SQLite and SQLite alternatives

Edge Database Comparison: SQLite and SQLite alternatives

SQLite and SQLite alternatives - databases for the Mobile and IoT edge

Updated comparison of mobile databases / edge databases

Note: This is an updated version of an earlier Mobile Database Comparison. Last Update: 2021.

According to the database of databases there are more than 700 databases as of 2021. However, that list does include hobby projects. DB-engines “only” lists databases that have significant traction and are well-maintained; they still count more than 300 databases as of 2021. However, only a handful of these databases are edge database.

What is an edge database?

An edge database is a database that runs directly on restricted devices locally. It is a local on-device database as opposed to a cloud database, resulting in significantly faster data. The term edge database is too young to have a Wikipedia article. However, we see it used in the IoT industry increasingly. In the field of IoT applications, it is especially important to distinguish databases that run locally on the device (“on the edge of the network”) and thus support Edge Computing from databases that run “in the cloud.” In our view, a mobile database is an edge database that runs on mobile devices, meaning the only difference between the terms edge database and mobile database is the operating system / device support they offer.

What is a mobile database?

While Wikipedia defines a mobile database as “Mobile computing devices (e.g., smartphones and PDAs) store and share data over a mobile network, or a database which is actually stored by the mobile device,” we solely refer to the latter ones as a mobile database. Meaning only databases that run on the mobile device (as the edge device) itself, locally, and store the data on the device. Therefore, we also refer to it as “on-device” database.

What is an edge device?

An edge device may be any device from a sensor, to an IoT gateway, to a car, to a Raspberry Pi, to a mobile phone (smartphone) to an on-premise server. Typically, the challenge arises when running on the smaller, more restricted devices. Generally, any database can run on a big on-premise server or cloud infrastructure with unlimited resources, but only few fit on a Raspberry Pi Zero. The other way around is no issue, meaning an edge databases can run well on a server. Therefore, in this comparison we look at databases that run on Raspberry Pi type size of devices (rule of thumb).

Edge Devices to run mobile /edge databases on

What are the advantages and disadvantages of working with SQLite?

SQLite is easily the most established edge database and probably the only “established” mobile database. SQLite is public domain and maintained by Richard Hipp. SQLite database has been around since the year 2000 and been embedded with iOS and Android since the beginning. SQLite is a relational database.

Advantages  Disadvantages
  • Toolchain, e.g. DB browser
  • No dependencies, is included with Android and iOS
  • Developers can define exactly the data schema they want
  • Developers have full control, e.g. handwritten SQL queries
  • SQL is a powerful and established query language, and SQLite supports most of it
  • Debuggable data: developers can grab the database file and analyze it
  • Rock-solid, widely used technology, established since the year 2000
  • Using SQLite means a lot of boilerplate code and thus inefficiencies (also in the long run with the app maintenance)
  • 1 MB BLOB Limitation on Android
  • No compile time checks (e.g. SQL queries)
  • The performance of SQLite is unreliable
  • SQL is another language to master
  • SQL queries can get long and complicated
  • Testability (how to mock a database?)
  • Especially when database views are involved, maintainability may suffer with SQLite

 

 

What are SQLite alternatives?

There are plenty of alternatives to working with SQLite directly. If you simply want to avoid writing lots of SQL and boilerplate code, you can use an object abstraction on top of SQLite. This abstraction layer is usually an ORM (object/relational mapper), e.g. greenDAO. While an ORM makes it easy to use SQLite at the beginning, there typically comes a point “where you hit SQLite”; so even when using an abstraction layer you need to understand SQLite and SQL in the longrun.

However, if you rather seek a complete replacement for SQLite, there are a few alternative databases: Couchbase Lite, Interbase, LevelDB, ObjectBox, Oracle Berkeley DB (formerly Oracle’s mobile database was “Oracle Database Lite”), Realm (now Mongo Realm), SnappyDB, SQL Anywhere, and UnQLite.

Obviously, if your also looking for alternatives that run in the cloud, there are a lot of cloud / server options out there that you can use as a replacement like e.g. Firebase. Though, with these your app will not work offline, response rates will be slower than with an on-device database and cannot be guaranteed, and last not least you will have much higher networking / cloud costs. You can find out more about the benefits of Edge Computing.

To give you an overview, we have compiled a small comparison table:

Edge Database Android / iOS* Type of data stored Sync Central Sync P2P Offline Sync Data level encryption License / business model Short description Minimum Footprint size Company
Azure SQL Edge (in preview) No Relational DB No No No will provide encryption Proprietary Designed as a SQL database for the IoT edge; however, due to the footprint it is no edge database 500 MB+ Microsoft
Couchbase Mobile (prior Couchbase Lite) Android / iOS JSON Documents / NoSQL db Yes Yes No Database encryption with SQLCipher (256-bit AES) Apache 2.0 Embedded / portable database with P2P and central synchronization (sync) support. Secure SSL. < 3,5 MB Couchbase
extremeDB iOS In-memory relational DB, hybrid persistence No No No AES encryption Proprietary Embedded relational database 200kB McObject LLC
ForestDB Android / iOS Key-value pairs / NoSQL db No No No No Apache 2.0 Portable lightweight key-value store, NoSQL database    
InterBase ToGo / IBLite Android / iOS Relational No No No 256 bit AES strength encryption Proprietary Embeddable SQL database. 400 KB Embarcadero
LevelDB Android / iOS Key-value pairs / NoSQL db No No No No New BSD Portable lightweight key-value store, NoSQL, no index support; benchmarks from 2011 have been removed unfortunately. 350kB LevelDB
Team
LiteDB Android / iOS (with Xamarin only) NoSQL document store No No No Salted AES MIT license A .Net embedded NoSQL database 350kb  
Mongo Realm (acquired in 2019) Android / iOS Object Database Yes No   Yes Proprietary with Apache 2.0 License APIs Embedded object database 5 MB+ Realm Inc
ObjectBox Android / iOS / Linux / Windows / any POSIX Object-oriented NoSQL edge database for high-performance on edge devices in Mobile and IoT Yes WIP Yes transport encryption; additional encryption upon request Apache 2.0 and Proprietary Embedded object-oriented NoSQL high-performance edge database with out-of-the-box data synchronization; fully ACID compliant; benchmarks available. < 1 MB ObjectBox
Oracle Database Lite Android / iOS Relational Yes Yes No 128-bit AES Standard encrytion Proprietary Portable with P2P and central sync support as well as support for sync with SQLite < 1 MB Oracle Corporation
redis DB No K/V in-memory store, typically used as cache No No No TLS/SSL-based encryption can be enabled for data in motion. Three clause BSD license, RSAL and Proprietary High-performance in-memory Key Value store with optional durability An empty instance uses ~ 3MB of memory. redislabs (the original author of redis left in 2020)
Snappy DB Android Key-value pairs / NoSQL db No No   No Apache 2.0 Portable lightweight key-value store, NoSQL database based on LevelDB   Nabil HACHICHA 
SQL Anywhere Android / iOS Relational Dependent No   AES-FIPS cipher encryption for full database or selected tables Proprietary Embedded / portable database with central snyc support with a stationary database   Sybase iAnywhere
SQLite embedded on iOS and Android Relational No No   No, Use SQLCipher to encrypt SQLite Public domain C programming library; probably 90% market share (very personal assumption, 2016) 500KiB Hwaci
SQL Server Compact Android / iOS Relational No No   Yes Proprietary Small-footprint embedded / portable database for Microsoft Windows mobile devices and desktops, supports synchronization with Microsoft SQL Server 2 MB Microsoft
UnQLite Android / iOS Key-value pairs / document store / NoSQL db No No     2-Clause BSD Portable lightweight embedded db; self-contained C library without dependency.   Symisc systems

If you are interested in an indication of the diffusion rate of databases and mobile databases, check out the following database popularity ranking: http://db-engines.com/en/ran.

Thanks for reading and sharing. Please let us know what you’re missing.

What Drives Edge Computing?

What Drives Edge Computing?

Data is exploding in every respect: in data volume, data velocity, and data variety (the 3 v’s). One driver of this phenomenon is the growing number of Mobile and IoT devices and thus, data sources. Making this data useful is one of the driving forces behind the adoption of Edge Computing. New use cases don’t only rely on using this data, but also upon the usability and speed of usability of this ever growing data. There are several practical challenges with this growing data volume that drive the adoption of Edge Computing:

New Use Cases Drive Edge Computing

what-drives-edge-computing

Bandwidth Limitations

The existing network infrastructure cannot support sending all the data to the cloud. Particularly in urban areas there is a concentration of devices and data overburdens existing infrastructure. While 5G promises some relief, it is no hailbringer. First of all, if you want to implement your IoT project now, 5G is not yet available and many questions about 5G remain, e.g. pricing. But moreover, as the number of devices and data is growing ever faster, it is already clear that data volumes will outpace what 5G can support. Edge Computing will be an important technology alongside 5G to enable IoT.

Fast Data Requirements  

Response time requirements are growing at the same time as data volumes are increasing. Sending data to the cloud for computation and storage means applications’ response times have a higher latency and depend on the network, which cannot guarantee response rates. Edge computing guarentees significantly faster data. Use cases that need speedy response times or guaranteed responses cannot rely on cloud computing. For example, in driver assistance, where every millisecond counts or in factory floors, where downtimes are too costly.

Sustainability

Sending data to the cloud and storing it there is inefficient and therefore costly – not only in plain €, but with regards to CO2 emissions too. The distance the data needs to travel needs hardware, connectivity and electric power. Therefore, sending data unnecessarily back and forth is wasteful beaviour and burdens the environment unnecessarily. With growing data volumes, that burden is growing. In fact, analysts predict  that cloud computing data centers will consume as much as 21% of the total global energy by 2030. [1]

To scale your prototype, you need to move to the edge

At the start of IoT projects, quick prototyping, testing and piloting on early iterations of an application’s functionalities, can effectively be done in the cloud. However, in productive environments when applications scale it is often hard or impossible to keep cloud costs at scale, making the business not viable. Then it is time to move to the edge.

At the same time, decreasing hardware costs and hardware sizes are enabling more complex local computing, meaning there is less need for additional cloud usage. E.g. increasingly AI and ML is done at the edge, including model training.

data-volume-edge-computing-solution-iot-mobile

Data accessibility and Smart Syncing

Today’s successful businesses require a smarter approach to data management and integration. Data synchronization increases operational efficiencies, saving time and resources by eliminating redundant data transfer. With data synchronization, only predefined, useful parts of a data set are sent to a central instance. This means that while large volumes of data can be collected and analyzed locally, not all of this data is sent to and saved in the cloud. This reduces the impact on bandwidth, utilizes the local hardware resources for fast guaranteed response times, and keeps project cloud costs low – ultimately creating a more sustainable and efficient model of data architecture, enabling long term project scalability. 

ObjectBox’ current database technology is enabling companies to persist and use data on edge devices, faster than any alternative on the market. It enables networks of edge devices working without a central instance, enabling even more new use cases.

Time Series & Objects: Using Data on the Edge

Time Series & Objects: Using Data on the Edge

Many IoT projects collect, both time series data and other types of data. Typically, this means they will run two databases: A time-series database and a traditional database or key/value store. This creates fracture and overhead, which is why ObjectBox TS brings together the best of both worlds in one database (DB). ObjectBox TS is a hybrid database: an extremely fast object-oriented DB plus a time-series extension, specially optimized for time series data. In combination with its tiny footprint, ObjectBox is a perfect match for IoT applications running on the edge. The out-of-the-box synchronization takes care of synchronizing selected data sets super efficiently and it works offline and online, on-premise, in the cloud.

time-series-data-example-temperature

What is time series data?

There are a lot of different types of data that are used in IoT applications. Time-series is one of the most common data types in analytics, high-frequency inspections, and maintenance applications for IIoT / Industry 4.0 and smart mobility. Time series tracks data points over time, most often taken at equally spaced intervals. Typical data sources are sensor data, events, clicks, temperature – anything that changes over time.

Why use time series data on the edge?

Time-series data sets are usually collected from a lot of sensors, which sample at a high rate – which means that a lot of data is being collected.

For example, if a Raspberry Pi gateway collects 20 data points/second, typically that would mean 1200 entries a minute measuring e.g. 32 degrees. As temperatures rarely change significantly in short time frames, does all of this data need to go to the cloud? Unless you need to know the exact temperature in a central location every millisecond, the answer is no. Sending all data to the cloud is a waste of resources, causing high cloud costs without providing immediate, real-time insights.

time-series-objects-edge

The Best of Both Worlds: time series + object oriented data persistence

With ObjectBox you aren’t limited to only using time series data. ObjectBox TS is optimized for time series data, but ObjectBox is a robust object oriented database solution that can store any data type. With ObjectBox, model your world in objects and combine this with the power of time-series data to identify patterns in your data, on the device, in real time. By combining time series data with more complex data types, ObjectBox empowers new use cases on the edge based on a fast and easy all-in-one data persistence solution. 

Bring together different data streams for a fusion of data; mix and match sensor data with the ObjectBox time series dashboard and find patterns in your data. On top, ObjectBox takes care of synchronizing selected data between devices (cloud / on-premise) efficiently for you.

time-series-data-visualization-dashboard

Get a complete picture of your data in one place

Use Case: Automotive (Process Optimization)

Most manufacturers, whether they’re producing cars, the food industry, or utilities, have already been optimizing production for a long period of time. However, there are still many cases and reasons why costly manual processes prevail.  One such example is automotive varnish. In some cases, while the inspection is automatic and intelligent, a lot of cars need to be touched up by hand, because the factors leading to the errors in the paint are not yet discovered. While there is a lot of internal expert know-how available from the factory workers, their gut feel is typically not enough to adapt production processes.

How can this be improved using time series and object data? 

The cars (objects) are typically already persisted including all the mass customization and model information. If now, all data, including sensor data, of the manufacturing site like temperature, humidity, spray speed (all time-series data) is persisted and added to each car object, any kind of correlations between production site variables, individual car properties and varnish quality can be detected. Over time, patterns will emerge. The gut feel of the factory workers would provide a great starting point for analyzing the data to discover Quick Wins before longterm patterns can be detected. Over time, AI and automatic learning kicks in to optimize the factory setup best possible to reduce the need for paint touch ups as much as possible. 

Use Case: Smart Grids

Utility grid loads shift continually throughout the day, effecting grid efficiency, pricing, and energy delivery. Using Smart Grids, utilities companies can increase efficiency and reliability in real time. In order to get insights from Smart Grids, companies need to collect a large volume of data from existing systems. A huge portion of this data is time series, e.g. usage and load statistics. On top, they incorporate other forms of data, e.g. asset relationship data, weather conditions, and customer profiles. Using visualization and analytical tools, these data types can be brought together to generate business insights and actionable operative goals.

ObjectBox TS: time series with objects

Storing and processing both time series data and objects on the edge, developers can gather complex data sets and get real time insight, even when offline. Combining these data types gives a fuller understanding and context for data – not only what happens over time, but what other factors could be influencing results. Using a fast hybrid edge database allows developers to save resources, while maintaining speed and efficiency. By synchronizing useful data to the cloud, real time data can be used for both immediate action, and post-event analysis.

Get in touch with our team to get a virtual demo of ObjectBox TS, or check out the sample GitHub repo to see more about the code.