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ObjectBox for Swift 1.4 makes object relations more natural and intuitive for Swift developers. For example, let’s take the teacher-student relation to Swift and how you store objects in the database. Let’s say “Teacher” is a Swift class that has a collection called “students”. Now let’s say we have a new teacher with new students and want to store them in the ObjectBox database. It’s done like this:

let yoda = Teacher(name: "Yoda")
yoda.students.append(Student(name: "Luke"))
yoda.students.append(Student(name: "Anakin"))
try box.put(yoda)

This is pretty much standard Swift. A single put command is enough to store all three new objects in the database (sorry for the “try”, Yoda, but you know, IO…). Now let’s see how this works. The students’ property in the Teacher’s class is of type ToMany<Student> and works like any Swift collection. This is because ToMany implements the protocols RandomAccessCollection and RangeReplaceableCollection. Under the hood however, it tracks all changes. Thus, when ObjectBox is instructed to put Yoda in a box, it also knows that two students were added. It also knows that our two Jedi students are new and thus puts them in database too. If you supply students that have been already persisted, it won’t put them. You can also mix new and existing objects.

Version 1.4 does not only bring TooMany (sic) improvements, but also brings a couple of new features, e.g. a bulk-get and read-only stores. You also may have heard of Sync (some kind of teleportation for objects, my young padawan). We’re still working on that, but we started to expose the Sync API with this release. It doesn’t come with any (space consuming) implementation so it’s really about getting early awareness and feedback. A full changelog is available at the docs.

So, time to start your (cocoa) pod again and let us know what you think. May the for… um, OK, that’s getting too many references for one article. One to many.